open positions

 

Graduate students

We have openings for graduate students enrolled in any graduate program at Stanford who would like to join the lab for a rotation. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a brief description of your background, coursework, and prior laboratory experience.

Medical Fellows

We welcome physicians and physician-scientists who are interested in pursuing research during their fellowship programs. Various projects in the lab are relevant to cancer, regeneration, neurodegenerative diseases and renal physiology and pathology. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references.

Post-doctoral position open:
Hedgehog signaling and primary cilia

The Rohatgi lab is recruiting a post-doctoral fellow interested in studying the biochemical and cell biological mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling. We have recently completed (see Developmental Cell 2018, PMID: 29290584) a comprehensive set of genome-wide CRISPR screens to identify positive, negative and attenuating regulators of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a pathway that plays central roles in development, regeneration and cancer. These screens have identified novel groups of genes that regulate the assembly of primary cilia, protein trafficking to cilia and Hedgehog signaling at all levels of the pathway from the cell surface to the nucleus. The next goal is understand both the biological and biochemical function of these genes. Many of these genes are likely to be involved in human birth defect syndromes linked to Hedgehog signaling and primary cilia (ciliopathies).

An ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Developmental Biology or related fields and have experience with the techniques in these areas. Experience with signaling assays, protein biochemistry, CRISPR methods and analysis of embryonic phenotypes in the mouse would be ideal. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references.

Post-doctoral position open:
Regulation of signal transduction by sterol lipids

Using a combination of chemical biology techniques, membrane protein biochemistry and crystallography, the Rohatgi lab, in close collaboration with Dr. Christian Siebold’s lab at Oxford, has uncovered a novel role for cholesterol and oxysterols in regulating Hedgehog signaling by direct regulation of Smoothened, a oncoprotein and drug target in Hh-driven cancers (See PMIDs 27705744, 27437577, 24171105, and 22231273). This work has resulted in high-resolution structures of Smoothened in complex with cholesterol and with anti-Smoothened drugs used in the clinic. Remarkably, our work suggests that sterols function as second messengers in Hedgehog signaling, both in the context of physiological and pathological signaling.  This project presents an ideal opportunity for an ambitious post-doctoral fellow to combine atomic-resolution structural analysis and membrane protein reconstitution with complex signaling and differentiation assays to uncover new biological and biochemical roles for these enigmatic endogenous lipids.

An ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Chemical Biology, Structural Biology or related fields and have experience with the techniques in these areas. Experience with membrane protein reconstitution, membrane protein crystallography or Cryo-EM, and lipid biochemistry and mass spectrometry would be ideal. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV, a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references

Post-doctoral position open:
WNT signaling in stem cells and cancer

The Rohatgi lab is recruiting a post-doctoral fellow interested in studying WNT signaling mechanisms. We recently completed (see Elife 2016, PMID: 27996937) a comprehensive set of genome-wide haploid screens to identify positive, negative and attenuating regulators of the WNT pathway, along with a unique set of screens to identity genes selectively required for signaling in the context of oncogenic WNT signaling (responsible for the driving most human colon cancers). This work led us to uncover a new mode of signaling by the R-spondin family of stem cell growth factors, which are stroma-derived secreted proteins that markedly enhance WNT signaling in specific tissue fields during development and in adult stem cells in the colon and other organs (Elife 2018, PMID 29405118).  Several exciting projects related to oncogenic WNT signaling and R-spondin signaling are available.

An ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Developmental Biology, Cell Biology, Cancer Biology or related fields and have experience with the techniques in these areas. Experience with mouse models of cancer or with colon-derived organoid culture would be ideal and nicely complement our expertise. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references.

Post-doctoral position open:
Protein phase separation and neurodegeneration

Over the past five years, protein phase separation has emerged as a key principle in cell organization, with particular implications for the mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease. The Rohatgi Lab is recruiting a post-doctoral fellow interested in studying the role of protein phase separation in both the normal function and pathological dysfunction of proteins implicated in neurodegeneration.  We have recently developed a powerful new phase separation reporter based on TDP-43, a protein that is found aggregated in many neurodegerative diseases and mutated in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Cell Reports 2016, PMID 4972689). We are using such reporters to understand how phase separation regulates protein function and to understand (and hopefully modify) the factors that regulate the dynamic properties and aggregation propensity of proteins that segregate into liquid droplets.

An ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Neurobiology, Cell Biology, Biochemistry or related fields and have experience with the techniques in these areas. Experience with live-cell imaging, neuronal cell culture, iPS-derived neurons and CRISPR methods would be ideal. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references.

Post-doctoral position open:
Cell homeostasis in the kidney

The Rohatgi lab is interested in recruiting a post-doctoral fellow interested in studying kidney cell biology and physiology using two newly emergent technologies: CRISPR-based screens and single-cell RNAseq data (being generated briskly for this and other organs).

An ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Physiology or related fields and have experience with the techniques in these areas. Experience with renal physiology and single-cell RNAseq methods would be ideal. Please email Raj Rohatgi (rrohatgi@stanford.edu) with a copy of your CV and a letter describing your prior research background, current research interests, and names of three references.